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How Nonprofit Ezines Build Exposure

Nonprofit ezines offer significant benefits as part of your marketing mix. In some cases, these electronic newsletter can even take the place of producing print newsletters. E-zines are a powerful way to build exposure for your nonprofit.

Nonprofit ezines are an inexpensive, effective way to stay in front of your readers, donors, and prospects. Word Wise at Nonprofit Copywriter

An ezine, also called and electronic magazine or an online newsletter, is published at a regular interval, such as monthly, bi-weekly, or weekly, and is delivered by email to your nonprofit’s readers and subscribers. Ezines help you communicate with your audience, build good will, and add to your donor base.

Here's why they have such an impact.

Targeted audience

Your ezine list is the ultimate targeted readership. Supporters, donors, partners, and friends of your organization – your ezine audience is comprised of those who are predisposed to hearing about your cause and how your organization meets needs. You collect email addresses when readers opt in on your website, give a gift, or interact in another way with your nonprofit. Additional readers who subscribe through your website or social media sites do so because they are interested in the content you offer.

Regular communication

By sending e-zines you can stay in touch with supporters and prospects and stay in front of them. An ezine at regular intervals keeps you on their radar. They’ll see that you’re “open for business.” Inspiring stories show them that your nonprofit is touching and changing lives. Hyperlinks drive them to your website, giving page, and social media sites.

Cost

Ezines are inexpensive. Unlike their print counterparts, they are not produced on paper or mailed in envelopes. They don’t require postage. Instead, your nonprofit can obtain an inexpensive account with an email list manager, build your ezine with its templates (branded with your logo, look, and feel), load your contact email addresses, and click “send.” The email list manager will report your open rate, record click-throughs, and handle bounces. Apart from the email manager fees, the only costs to your nonprofit are writing the ezine and loading it. Most ezines (especially produced by nonprofits) are free to readers, so you don’t need to “sell” them on subscribing.

Convenience

Copywriting ezines (versus print newsletters) allow you to compose, edit, format, proofread, and send with a few clicks of the button. Print publications require a more involved editorial schedule, like viewing proofs, printing queues, and snail mail delivery. Electronic newsletters’ quick turnaround makes it easy to communicate with your readership during an emergency, too.

Multi-Usability

You can re-send your ezine to new prospects, link to it on your social media sites, and create an electronic newsletter archive on your website. More exposure means more readers – and more interest and support for your organization and your cause.


More tips on writing nonprofit newsletters and ezines

29 kinds of newsletter articles you can write ...

Top newsletter article tips: how to make sure your articles get read ...

What's a listicle and how do I write one that sticks?

What are ezines and do I need to publish one?

Top tip on writing a newsletter: feature a heartfelt feature story ...

Email and ezine terms for writers, leaders, and newbie copywriters ...

Your nonprofit ezine: why should readers subscribe?

What to write in your welcome email to new subscribers ...

10 commandments for nonprofit newsletters ...

Images for newsletters: use real photos (when you can) ...


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